COMMUNITY VOICE (SAUTI JIJINI).

Governments cannot tackle violent extremism alone. A more just and secure world is only possible when communities works alongside governments, multilateral institutions, and corporations.

Improving efforts in prevention means understanding communities. To prevent violence, policymakers must truly understand community dynamics, which are deeply contextual. Inherent to this understanding is a thorough conception of the diverse needs of men, women, boys and girls — again, in a deeply context-specific way. Our prevention involves teaching women the warning signs of radicalization and violence, and how to respond. When “women are engaged in the earliest signs, they are empowered to ask hard questions (of their sons, brothers and husbands)

Women and girls have plays key roles as ideologues, facilitators, fundraisers, and recruiters for violent extremist groups. The international community increasingly recognizes that failure to account for the agency and motivations of women in supporting violent extremism can result in ineffectual responses. To help address this gap the Ngao Foundation with support from partners, has aligned its program to target women and girls between the ages of 13 and 35, engaged in, or at risk of, radicalization to violent extremism in the slums and informal settlements in building safe and resilient communities.

We are best placed as a grass root organization to identify the drivers of violent extremism and also tackle the underlying factors to build resilient communities.

The Ngao Foundation focus on three main areas: